Les Misrables, by Victor Hugo period 4 (Hayden, Austin, Tucker)
William's Literary Profile:

5494_silver_candlesticks_1.jpg
Item:1
In the very begging of the story, Jean Valjean is nothing more then a released criminal to the public. He has no shelter, little money, and no food. He goes to the town of M---- sur M---- in search of a place to stay. He arrives at a bishop's house who unexpectedly lets him in to stay the night even knowing that Jean was a thief. During the night he stayed, Jean snuck into the bishop's room and stole a basket of silver pieces stored above the bed. He then quickly ran off with the stolen pieces only to be apprehended and brought back to the bishops house. The men who caught Valjean asked the bishop if he had given the silver to Jean. The bishop looked at Valjean and said "yes i had given them to him, but he also forgot these two candle sticks. Take them, they are a gift". He set Valjean free by lying to the men, but he said to valjean i give you these in hope that you will become an honest man in the eyes of god. Jean Valjean keeps these gifts throughout the story to show they were a big turning point in his life. The picture of the 2 candle sticks above are representing those that were in the story.
external image France_1824.jpg

Item:2
This is a silver piece. In the story right after Jean left m---- sur m-----, he met a boy named Piet Gravis. Piet Gravis was flipping a silver piece in his hand and dropped it. Jean put his foot on the piece before the boy could recover it. Piet screamed and begged Jean to get off of his silver piece but jean stayed silent and still. Finally Piet ran off crying, later Jean Valjean removed his foot and picked up the silver piece and studied it for a few minuets. He then chased after Piet to return the stolen silver. This part was significant because Jean was silent throughout the entire robbery. This was the turning point when in his mind decided to become a good man. The picture of a old french silver piece is representing the piece that Jean stole that transformed his life.

Item:3
This item was a video clip from the musical "Les Miserables". The video clip showed Cosette's mom Fantine being accused of assaulting a man for no apparent reason. Before she is dragged off to jail, Jean Valjean steps in and saves her from her false punishment. He had nothing to do with the situation but he stepped in and stopped it while under the identity of Monsiour mayor. This clip showed an example of Jeans transformation as a person that victor hugo demonstrates with many characters in the story. The Jean in the begging of the story would have simply let Fantine go to jail and never defended her.



Austin' Literary Profile:
so-sad-myra-evans.jpg
This is a painting by Myra Evans, and I believe the feelings seen in the man in the painting are similar to Jean Valjean's feelings for the duration of his imprisonment. For 19 years he was in jail, and after 19 years of the same routine of hard labor, disgusting food, and lack of companionship, it is understandable that someone would be depressed and look like the man in the painting. When I think of Jean Valjean during those 19 years, I picture him looking like this painting (minus the clown-like features).



This is a song from the Disney movie, "Annie," which is about a little girl who is an orphan. Through a series of events, Annie and her dog Sandy are adopted by a billionaire, and their lives drastically change from that point on. This can be related to Les Miserables in two ways:
1) You can compare Annie to Cosette because they are both little girls who live their childhood in an orphanage.
2) Annie is similar to Jean Valjean because they both start out poor and become very wealthy in a short amount of time.
Either way, the message stays strong that people can change; including people's social statuses.


Dear Papa,
I wish you were still with us at this time, but other than that, my life is like a dream come true. I will never forget how you risked your own life to take care of me and raise me as your own daughter. You saved me from a certain life of poverty and hard labor, and introduced me to a classy, sophisticated society. From all the years living with you, I learned how to love. That is why I was so certain about Marius the day we first talked. I only wish I could say all of this to you in person, but you are in a better place now; a place far, far away from the cruel, unforgiving world we live in.
Love,
Cosette

This is a poem that Cosette would have written to Jean Valjean after he died. I was thinking of a better ending for the novel, and I came to the conclusion that a good ending would have been Cosette writing this letter to Valjean and setting it down on his grave.



Hayden's Literary Profile:
SILVER.jpg
The silver candlesticks given to Jean Valjean by the bishop were undoubtedly one of the most important objects in his possession. The candlesticks seem to represent all that is good about Jean; silver, symbolically speaking, can represent purity or cleanliness, and once the bishop gave them to Valjean, it's almost as if their purity rubbed off on him, creating the reformed man that he became. Jean Valjean kept these candlesticks throughout his entire life, even to his dying day.


JEAN VALJEAN ESCAPES YET AGAIN
During the trial of Father Champmathieu, Monsieur Madeleine, the mayor of M---- sur M----, announced to the court that he is, in fact, Jean Valjean, a man who served 19 years of hard labor for burglary, attempted escape five or six times, and is the suspect of yet another burglary. Madeleine, who brought immense wealth to M---- sur M----, was also well-known for his charity; he seemed to make a habit of giving to the poor. One can assume that Jean created this guise of philanthropy in order to elude the authorities; he even managed to avoid inspector Javert who happened to be a prison guard in Toulon at the time that Valjean served. Valjean was stripped of his title as mayor and placed back in Prison immediately after he confessed. Soon after Jean was captured and jailed, he promptly escaped. According to inspector Javert, Valjean is accompanied by a young girl by the name of Cosette. If you have any information on this dangerous man please contact the authorities immediately.

This is an article that probably would have been published after the events mentioned in the article. First of all, the reaction of the populace after reading this article would be one of sheer incredulity; how could such a kind, philanthropic mayor be a criminal? But more importantly, this article shows the vast amount of morality Jean obtained after the incident with the bishop. He quite simply could have let Father champmatieu take the blame for him, but, in good conscience, he could not allow it; he had to turn himself in. Also, this article shows the incident that sparked Javert's relentless pursuit of Jean Valjean, and when one examines the next artifact, one can see the severity of change Javert experiences at the end of the novel.




This is a clip from the movie "Les Miserables" that clearly shows two signifigant changes in character and position. First of all, Javert, the once diligent, law- abiding inspector, decides to spare Jean Valjean after he himself spared him. Secondly, Jean Valjean is finally allowed to escape from his past at this point; he finally becomes a free man, and, as you can tell by the elated expression on his face, is extremely satisfied by this opportunity.



Les Miserables: A summary

Jean Valjean, after serving 19 years in prison for stealing a loaf of bread and trying to escape from his sentence, is finally set free. Unfortunately, he is branded as a criminal and it seems as if nobody even wants to be around him. A bishop, generously allows Valjean to stay in his home, however, Jean decides to steal the bishop�s silver in the middle of the night. After the authorities catch him they bring him back to the bishop�s house. Out of pure benevolence, the bishop claimed the silver was a gift and offered him his silver candlesticks. After making an immense profit by creating a new method of producing glassware, Jean Valjean become the philanthropic mayor of M--- Sur M----, Monsieur Madeleine. One day an elderly man named Fauchelevent was screaming for help, for he was trapped underneath a horse-cart. Madeleine, with immense strength, uses his body as a lever to lift the cart and allow Fauchelevent to escape. Javert, the inspector of police, after witnessing this impressive act, remembers that a man he guarded in prison could perform similar acts of strength; his name was jean Valjean. However, another man, Father Champmathieu, is accused of being Jean after stealing apples that fell from a tree. Madeleine, in good conscience, could not allow this man to take the fall for him, so he announced to the court that he was Jean Valjean. Meanwhile, Fantine, a poor, single, and jobless mother has given Cosette, her daughter, to the Thernadiers to take care of. Unfortunately, Fantine falls ill. At this point, Madeleine (Jean Valjean) is taking care of her, however, Javert enters the room in order to bring Madeleine to jail. This mysterious appearance and the heated conversation between Javert and jean frighten the fragile Fantine, killing her. Javert takes Jean to prison, but he promptly escapes and takes Cosette from the Thernadiers. But Javert is dangerously close on their trail, so Jean decides to hide in a convent, a safe heaven from the authorities. Jean decides to stay at the convent, and for 10 years he works as a gardener along side Fauchevelent, while Cosette attends the classes. Jean and Cosette move to Paris, where Cosette meets Marius, a young boy who she quickly forms a romantic relationship with. However, Jean Valjean informs Cosette that they must move, and Marius, believing he cannot survive without her, enters the rebel�s barricade during the revolution to fight. Interestingly enough, the rebels have Javert tied up in the corner under suspicion that he is a spy. Jean Valjean enters and decides that he shall kill Javert. He takes Javert outside, unties him, shoots into the air, and allows him to leave. Marius, in addition to the plethora of wounds he�s already received, is shot in the shoulder and falls over. Jean quickly catches him and carries him into the sewer so that they can avoid the police that are storming the barricade. After trekking through the perilous sewer, Valjean emerges only to be apprehended by Javert. Valjean pleads to take Marius to his grandfather�s house and Javert lets him, when he finishes, he is ready to give himself up to Javert, but he is nowhere to be found. Javert, after finally making the right choice and allowing Valjean to go free, throws himself into the water, drowning himself. After recovering, Marius marries Cosette. Jean Valjean dies of old age alongside his beloved daughter and her husband.



A critical analysis


What defines a man. Is he written off by the cover of his book and never seen by the everlasting possibly contradicting pages inside? Victor Hugo would have argued no. Throughout the book Jean Valjeans good deeds are overlooked and seen as insignificant compared to his title of ex convict. He enters the city of M----- sur M----- with nothing but the small amount of money with him and the sight of backs turned on him. Later in the story he is praised as a saint and known well across France as a generous kind man. However he only achieves this version of repentance by using a false identity. Once his identity is revealed to the world (by sacrificing himself for the freedom of another man) he is yet again perused by Javert. It seemed the world was oblivious to the fact that Monsieur mayor was Jean Valjean. Jean Valjean was that saint they all loved. Jean Valjean continues to do nothing but good. His relentless ambition is a key trait Hugo portrays, even though the same people he helped were those who shunned him for being an ex-convict.
Hugo focuses on tragedy throughout the story. The story is filled with glimpses of smaller stories intertwined within each other. Such as the story of Fantine and Cosette. Fantine gives her child to the Thénardiers so Fantine may leave and find work as a prostitute and send her earnings to the Thénardiers to support her child. Fantine later dies but Valjean is by her side when she dies and promises to bring her child back and care for her. Valjean then develops a deep care for cosette and treats her as his own child. Hugo uses cosette to show that there was more to Valjean then a simple thirst for repentance and fear of being a bad man in the eyes of god. Cosette shows the love Valjean needs and gives. This is the same ex convict that the world saw as nothing but a monster. This monster has been doing all of these good deeds to do nothing but repent for the sins he had committed in his life before. In the end of the story the man who has been perusing him; Javert, see's that with all the good deeds he has done it is not right to arrest him. However Javert kills himself after releasing Valjean for breaking the law.
This is hugo showing the corruption in law and those who abide strictly by it. Regardless of the good deeds in a mans life he is always held by the bad he has done. Although everyman can change, and does. Valjean changed to repent from the inspiration of the merciful bishop, Javert changed in the end by releasing a man who has done much more right then wrong.
The entire story is a Hugos way of showing a journey of a man who was once a ruthless criminal, shunned by society and feared by it, became a hero. He saved Cosette from Thénardiers and cared for her as if she were his own child. He rescued Marius and under his ego of Monsieur Madaline he gave money to the poor and gave jobs. The entire story elaborated the changes in people. Javert in the end was a change that he could not handle, to work and enforce such corrupted ways of the law.





Why should I read Les Miserables?

There are many reasons to read Les Miserables. One of which is to be entertained by the dramatic, romantic, mind-blowing qualities of the novel. It is considered a masterpiece by people all around the world. Les Miserables takes you on Jean Valjean's life adventure, and how he makes the transition from thief to philanthropist. It is a fairly short read, but towards the end, you almost don't want it to end. The final climax will have you on the edge of your seat, and you will be reading too fast for your eyeballs to move from word to word.



Artifact 1
"If the soul is left in darkness, sins will be committed. The guilty one is not he who commits the sin, but the one who causes the darkness."

This quote from Victor Hugo is quite applicable to the novel. When Jean Valjean was in prison, he saw unspeakable actions and was constantly surrounded by immoral people; he was in the darkness, so he sinned. At one point in the novel, a bishop, out of pure benevolence, allowed Jean to sleep at his house, but he was still used to behaving as he did in the galleys, so, out of greed, he decided to steal the bishop's silver in the middle of the night. However, the authorities immediately caught him and brought the thief back to the bishop's house. The bishop claimed that the silver was a gift and proceeded to offer Valjean his silver candlesticks as well. This selfless act of kindness was a completely foreign thought for Jean, but it changed him. The light purged the darkness, a drastic event that motivated Jean Valjean to reform himself, showing how influential the environment is to humans;it is constantly changing us.



Artifact 2
Victor Hugo (1802-1885), novelist, poet, and dramatist, is one of the most important of French Romantic writers. Among his best-known works are The Hunchback of Notre Dame(1831) and Les Mis�rables(1862).


Victor Hugo was born in Besan�on as the son of a army general, who taught young Victor to admire Napoleon as a hero. After the separation of his parents, he was raised and educated in Paris by his mother, where the family settled when Hugo was two. From 1815 to 1818 Hugo attended the Lyc�e Louis-le Grand in Paris. He began in early adolescence to write verse tragedies and poetry, and translated Virgil. Hugo's first collection of poems, Odes Et Poesies Diverses gained him a royal pension from Louis XVIII. As a novelist Hugo made his debut with Han D'Islande (1823) followed by Bug-Jargal (1826). In 1822 Hugo married Ad�le Foucher who was the daughter of an officer at the ministry of war.
Hugo gained wider fame with his play Hernani (1830) and with his famous historical work The Hunchback of Notre Dame(1831) which became an instant success. Since its appearance in 1831 the story has became part of popular culture. The novel, set in 15th century Paris, tells a moving story of a gypsy girl Esmeralda and the deformed bell ringer, Quasimodo, who loves her. In the 1830s Hugo published several volumes of lyric poetry, Hugo's lyrical style was rich, intense and full of powerful sounds and rhythms, and although it followed the bourgeois popular taste of the period it also had bitter personal tones. Among his most ambitious works was an epic poem, "Et nox facta est," ("And There Was Night"), a study of Satan's fall. The poem was never completed.
In his later life Hugo became involved in politics as a supporter of the republican form of government. After three unsuccessful attempts, Hugo was elected in 1841 to the Acad�mie Francaise. This triumph was shadowed by the death of Hugo's daughter L�opoldine in 1843. It was only after a decade that Hugo again published books. He devoted himself to politics, advocating social justice. After the 1848 revolution, with the formation of the Second Republic, Hugo was elected to the Constitutional Assembly and to the Legislative Assembly.
When the coup d'�tat by Louis Napoleon (Napoleon III) took place in 1851, Hugo believed his life to be in danger. He fled to Brussels and then to Jersey and Guernsey in the English Channel. Hugo's partly voluntary exile lasted 20 years. During this time he wrote at Hauteville House some his best works, including Les Chatimets (1853) and Les Mis�rables(1862), an epic story about social injustice.
The political upheaval in France and the proclamation of the Third Republic made Hugo return to France. During the period of the Paris Commune, Hugo lived in Brussels, from where he was expelled for sheltering defeated revolutionaries. After a short time of living as a refuge in Luxemburg, he returned to Paris and was elected senator. Hugo died in Paris on May 22, 1885. He was given a national funeral, attended by two million people, and buried in the Panth�on.

Victor Hugo's life was clearly a hectic one; it seems as if he was always moving and always subject to new events. These fluctuations in his lifestyle ( most noteworthy the death of his daughter and the revolution) altered his writing style severely; after tragedies he became despondent and during political events he was a passionate advocate of social justice. Interestingly enough, Victor's life correlates with Les Miserables's prominent theme: people (their characteristics, morals, interests etc.) constantly changing. Jean Valjean, once heartless, became selfless after being reintroduced to kindness. It's quite possible that Victor Hugo's haphazard life was what he based Les Miserables off of.



Artifact 3

cgon370l.jpg

This illustration shows a man gazing at a board showing his progress in some sort of maze. This 'maze' is evidently a representation of life; we are constantly traveling through it taking different routes and developing different methods. The "You were here" visible on the board, is a clear inference to our constantly changing ways as we travel through the maze of life. The board is showing the man where (or what) he once was, but as you can see, he is no longer there. He is constantly traveling, constantly changing, and judging by the smile on his face, he has clearly become a better person.



Artifact 4

By including clever and suggestive lines like 'In the morning, I'll be a new man" and "you've promised to become a new man" "You no longer belong to evil... and now I give you back to God." this clip clearly shows Jean Valjean's moral metamorphosis. The bishop's selfless act of kindness set Jean on the track to purity, and changed him into a completely different individual.



Artifact 5

Victor Hugo's work was reflected upon the tragedies bestowed upon him throughout his life. One of which was the death of his first child L�opold during infancy.The biggest tragic event was the early death of his newly married daughter and her husband. She was his favorite child and her death impacted his writing style to turn into a more depressing read. Hugo learned the death of his child by reading the newspaper one day. This is the newspaper similar to what hugo would have read.


Newly weds drown in boat capsize!

86480333.jpgA young recently married couple was found dead on September 4th, 1843 in the Seine by Villequier. The newly weds were found and identified as Mr.Vaquerie and his bride L�opoldine Catherine Hugo. L�opoldine was born on the 28th of August 1824 and was only 20 at the time of the accident. She and her husband Charles Vaquerie were seen going down the Seine going for a romantic evening together, but when the boat capsized their evening was cut short when L�opoldine�s skirt was made of thick heavy fabrics that when soaked dragged her under. Charles dove to save her but only resulted in perishing as well. The cause of the capsized boat is inconclusive but it is confirmed that this was an accident.



Artifact #6:
The book was made into a movie in 1998. The movie portrayed a visual form of the book. It showed the problems and obstacles that both Javert and Jean Valjean had encountered in the book. The movie brought more people to see the story of Valjean than the book did, due to that more people saw the movie then read the novel. The movie excluded some of the events in the book such as Valjean's encounter with Piet Gravis.The movie was directed by Bille August and produced by Sarah Radclyffe.

The following is a link to a review to the movie and how the audiences reacted to the story of Les Misrables.
Click Here!


Artifact #7:
File:Ebcosette.jpg
File:Ebcosette.jpg


Title page of the novel. The picture shows how inferior Cosette was to her surroundings when she was a child. She was treated like a slave in the house she lived in and she never knew either one of her parents. Towards the end of the novel, under the wings of Jean Valjean, she lives a wealthy life and is treated like royalty. This artifact shows how people can change; not just from thief to philanthropist, but from poor to rich as well.



Artifact #8:

Link to Trailer: Click Here!

This is the trailer of the movie "Les Misrables," from 1998. The movie has been known to accurately depict the full message and theme of the novel, that no matter what happened in the past, people can change.



Artifact #9:

THE POOR CHILDREN
by: Victor Hugo (1802-1885)
TAKE heed of this small child of earth;
He is great; he hath in him God most high.
Children before their fleshly birth
Are lights alive in the blue sky.

In our light bitter world of wrong
They come; God gives us them awhile.
His speech is in their stammering tongue,
And his forgiveness in their smile.

Their sweet light rests upon our eyes.
Alas! their right to joy is plain.
If they are hungry Paradise
Weeps, and, if cold, Heaven thrills with pain.

The want that saps their sinless flower
Speaks judgment on sin's ministers.
Man holds an angel in his power.
Ah! deep in Heaven what thunder stirs,

When God seeks out these tender things
Whom in the shadow where we sleep
He sends us clothed about with wings,
And finds them ragged babes that weep!

This is a poem written by Victor Hugo, the author of Les Miserables. It suggests a similar theme to that in the novel because the poem says how we are all the same and we are all created equally. The poem uses a child as an example of how people may do something wrong, but people will still look at them the same as before. The key to this poem is forgiveness, and that is most commonly found in young children.



es Miserables Research Log

Obituaries on Jean, Javert, and Victor Hugo
Paintings
Clip from Play - William
Clip from movie
Music - William
Newspaper articles - William
Cartoons - HAYDEN
Invitation to a wedding
History of Author - HAYDEN
Quote - HAYDEN
Title - AUSTIN
Film trailer
Film poster
Critical analysis - William

http://www.cartoonstock.com/cartoonview.asp?catref=cgon370



A site that posts cartoons in order to deliver a message.

http://www.gavroche.org/vhugo/lmquotes.gav

“If the soul is left in darkness, sins will be committed. The guilty one is not he who commits the sin, but the one who causes the darkness.”

A site that offers various quotes from popular historical figures.


http://www.online-literature.com/victor_hugo/

Victor Hugo (1802-1885), novelist, poet, and dramatist, is one of the most important of French Romantic writers. Among his best-known works are The Hunchback of Notre Dame(1831) and Les Misérables(1862).
Victor Hugo was born in Besançon as the son of a army general, who taught young Victor to admire Napoleon as a hero. After the separation of his parents, he was raised and educated in Paris by his mother, where the family settled when Hugo was two. From 1815 to 1818 Hugo attended the Lycée Louis-le Grand in Paris. He began in early adolescence to write verse tragedies and poetry, and translated Virgil. Hugo's first collection of poems, Odes Et Poesies Diverses gained him a royal pension from Louis XVIII. As a novelist Hugo made his debut with Han D'Islande (1823) followed by Bug-Jargal (1826). In 1822 Hugo married Adèle Foucher who was the daughter of an officer at the ministry of war.
Hugo gained wider fame with his play Hernani (1830) and with his famous historical work The Hunchback of Notre Dame(1831) which became an instant success. Since its appearance in 1831 the story has became part of popular culture. The novel, set in 15th century Paris, tells a moving story of a gypsy girl Esmeralda and the deformed bell ringer, Quasimodo, who loves her.
In the 1830s Hugo published several volumes of lyric poetry, Hugo's lyrical style was rich, intense and full of powerful sounds and rhythms, and although it followed the bourgeois popular taste of the period it also had bitter personal tones. Among his most ambitious works was an epic poem, "Et nox facta est," ("And There Was Night"), a study of Satan's fall. The poem was never completed.
In his later life Hugo became involved in politics as a supporter of the republican form of government. After three unsuccessful attempts, Hugo was elected in 1841 to the Académie Francaise. This triumph was shadowed by the death of Hugo's daughter Léopoldine in 1843. It was only after a decade that Hugo again published books. He devoted himself to politics, advocating social justice. After the 1848 revolution, with the formation of the Second Republic, Hugo was elected to the Constitutional Assembly and to the Legislative Assembly.
When the coup d'état by Louis Napoleon (Napoleon III) took place in 1851, Hugo believed his life to be in danger. He fled to Brussels and then to Jersey and Guernsey in the English Channel. Hugo's partly voluntary exile lasted 20 years. During this time he wrote at Hauteville House some his best works, including Les Chatimets (1853) and Les Misérables (1862), an epic story about social injustice.
The political upheaval in France and the proclamation of the Third Republic made Hugo return to France. During the period of the Paris Commune, Hugo lived in Brussels, from where he was expelled for sheltering defeated revolutionaries. After a short time of living as a refuge in Luxemburg, he returned to Paris and was elected senator. Hugo died in Paris on May 22, 1885. He was given a national funeral, attended by two million people, and buried in the Panthéon.
A site that offers a variety of different information on authors and posts their numerous works.





http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXy_YqXkjSQ

A video- hosting site that offers a wide collection of films of varying length and style

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ebcosette.jpg



Obtained from Wikipedia, a site that offers information on a variety of topics.

Here is My part of the bibliography..

Works Cited Page
Newmark, John. “Les Miserables – Quotations.” Victor Hugo Central. September 6, 2009. January 5, 2011 < http://www.gavroche.org/vhugo/lmquotes.gav>
Goddard, Clive. “Buddhist – You Were Here.” Cartoonstock. January 5, 2011. <http://www.cartoonstock.com/cartoonview.asp?catref=cgon370>
“Victor Hugo – Biography.” The Literature Network. 2010. January 5, 2011. http://www.online-literature.com/victor_hugo/
“Les Miserables(1998)- Part 1” Youtube. January 23, 2010. January 5, 2011. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXy_YqXkjSQ

and here is my part of the endnotes..

We decided to choose the quote from the novel because it addresses the exact theme that we are trying to convey. In the story, this quote was used to describe Jean Valjean, a man corrupted by, but also saved by his environment, which pertains to the theme perfectly.
We decided to choose the cartoon because it offers an excellent illustration that is relevant and interesting. The cartoon pulls the audience in and also makes the information we are trying to explain easily understandable
We decided to choose a biography of Victor Hugo because, not only does his life pertain to the chosen theme, but it shows how his lifestyle contributed to the plot, themes, and even characters in the novel. Over all, it gives our audience a firm grasp on Les Miserables
We decided to choose a clip from the movie, “Les Miserables”, because it offers a vivid illustration of the scene between Jean Valjean and the bishop, and in conjunction with strategically chosen dialogue and accompanying music, the audience can understand and perhaps even delve into a deeper grasp of the theme.

Austin End notes:
We decided to include a picture of the title page because its relation to the novel is obvious and the theme is consistent. It shows Cosette sweeping, although the broom, and all of her surroundings are much larger than she is.
We decided on using the trailer for the movie because the movie was a very accurate depiction of the theme of the novel.
We decided on including a poem written by Victor Hugo because it shows how his feelings are shown through more than one of his writings. A mutual theme is found in Les Miserables and The Poor Children

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Les_Mis%C3%A9rables
A site where public knowledge is deposited in order to create an entire encyclopedia of everything.
http://www.zuguide.com/#Les-Miserables
A site that acts as an all purpose film guide. Complete with trailers, reviews, and upcoming movies.
http://www.poetry-archive.com/h/the_poor_children.html
A site that contains poems from a variety of different authors from the past centuries.


William end notes:
We put a music clip on the page because it is the same music "i dream a dream" in the musical les mis







`